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Sick today

Hi all, 

I’ve been fighting a cold today and it’s winning. I won’t be able to tutor your memos tomorrow. I believe the regular schedule is full, but keep a look out for cancelled appointments. You can also share your papers with one another for advice. 

Stay well!

Shannon

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Hi all,

I will hold walk-in hours on Monday, Oct. 5 from 11:00-1:00 in the Writing Center to talk about your one-page film proposals.

You can also sign up with another tutor at cws.agnesscott.edu.

Use this link to make your Speaking Center appointments as well–remember that they fill up fast!

Have a great Black Cat weekend!

Shannon

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Hi all,

You do not have memos due this Thursday. If you’d like to meet and talk about Professor Ingram’s feedback on your first memos, I’ll be in the Writing Center on Wednesday (tomorrow) from 2:00PM-3:00PM.

Remember that you can always sign up for tutoring with another tutor as well.

Thanks!

Shannon

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You all did a great job on this first writing assignment! I’m so excited to see what you have to say about the films we watch in class as the semester progresses. As I mentioned yesterday, there were a few issues/opportunities for growth in these first pieces. I’m listing them below so you can keep them in mind as you write your first memos. Check out the links to the Writing Center handouts for tips on addressing some of these concerns. There are also hard copies of the handouts in the Writing Center on the ground floor of the library.

1. Summary vs. analysis. You all had great nuggets of original thought in your papers, but you can use more! You probably won’t need more than a sentence of plot summary for the memos. See Writing Center Handout #13.

2. Pick one topic and stick with it! This can be a real challenge. Many of us have a lot to say, but you have to hone in on one topic, especially when you only have a page. See Writing Center Handout #7

3. Once you’ve picked your topic, express it clearly in your introduction. Readers should know your argument after reading the first paragraph of your paper. Handout #10 is a general guide to introductions. Remember that yours will be short (2-3 sentences) for a one-page paper. 

4. Show, don’t tell. Use as many specifics as possible (but make sure they’re relevant to your main topic). See Handout #40: Clarity Clarified

These handouts might also be helpful:

#35: Thinking It Through: A Guide to Writing Think Pieces, Reflection Papers, and Reaction Papers

# 36: Writing About Film

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